Exhibits

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Fort Concho traces the American military experience from the end of the Civil War to the turn of the 20th century through various exhibits, displays, and artifacts. Comprised of 24 original and restored structures, the site’s tour buildings are presented with a mixture of original and replica furnishings, equipment and artillery. Six fort structures represent various building interiors from the 1870s and 1880s, while a modern Living History Stable houses wagons and space for equines.  Remaining buildings serve as housing for staff offices, rental space, and storage.


The site also offers a series of rotating exhibits that concern a wide range of themes and subjects.

The Douglas McChristian Collection

The objects displayed in Barracks 1 come to Fort Concho from Douglas McChristian of Arizona. These objects represent one of the largest privately owned collections illustrating the frontier soldier experience, as well as a life’s work of acquisition, study, research and documentation. Doug’s thirty-five year career in the National Park Service at many western historic sites and his numerous books and articles rank him as a top western military historian. Tragically, Doug passed away last September after a long illness, but it was his wish that the full collection be housed at Fort Concho for future display, study, and research. These objects not highlight the history of the 19th century military, they honor the legacy of a recognized scholar and historian who spent a lifetime studying the frontier regular army.

Comprised of over 1000 original uniform pieces, equipment, documents and other items, the collection is showcased in small thematic rotating displays in the Visitor Center at Barracks 1. The theme for the current exhibition: Summer.

 

The E.H. Danner Museum of Telephony

The E.H. Danner Museum of Telephony pays tribute to the world of telephone communication. Housed in one of the site’s Officers’ Quarters, the collection of antique instruments, equipment, and devices chronicles the evolution of communication and highlights some of the industry’s local leading figures. From a Kellogg single-position manual magneto switchboard to Alexander Graham Bell's "Gallows Frame Phone,” the museum of telephony has a diverse range of artifacts. Originally housed at the old headquarters of GTE Central in San Angelo, the collection was relocated to Fort Concho in November of 1990.

 

What’s Old is New

(Temporarily Unavailable)

This special collections exhibit highlights new acquisitions to the Fort Concho Collections Department. Each of these diverse objects fits within a certain educational need and are essential to the mission of our museum. As additional donations are received, new objects are transitioned into this exhibit.

 

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